The Patent Prosecution Highway (PPH) Pilot Program and the Brazilian PTO – Recent Updates

 

The Brazilian Patent and Trademark Office (Brazilian PTO, also known as the Instituto Nacional da Propriedade Industrial (INPI)), has made two major announcements regarding the Patent Prosecution Highway (PPH) Pilot Program in Brazil since the beginning of November.

PPH Program with the European Patent Office

On November 7, 2017, the Brazilian PTO published Rule #202/2017 implementing the PPH Pilot Program (Program) with the European Patent Office (EPO).  The hope is that the implementation of the Program will result in faster examination of pending Brazilian patent applications having a counterpart allowed by the EPO.

Logistically, the Program will accept applications belonging to patent families whose earliest application has been filed in the Brazilian PTO or the EPO, or for PCT applications, where either the Brazilian PTO or EPO was used as the Receiving Office.  All applications are eligible with one notable exception.  Specifically, while applications in the field of chemistry or related technologies applied to medicine may be eligible for the Program, drug-related patent applications are specifically excluded.  More specifically, the application must be classified under the International Patent Codes (IPC) listed in the below table to be accepted.  However, applications classified under any of the group of A61K subclass, with the exception of group A61K8, are also excluded from the program.  Generally, IPC group A61K relates to preparations for medical, dental, or toilet purposes.  Group A61K8 relates to cosmetics or similar toilet preparations.

TECHNICAL AREA IPC CODE
Basic Chemistry A01N, A01P, C05#, C06#, C09B, C09C, C09D, C09F, C09G, C09H, C09J, C09K, C10B, C10C, C10F, C10G, C10H, C10J, C10K, C10L, C10M, C10N, C11B, C11C, C11D, C99Z
Organic and fine chemistry C07B, C07C, C07D, C07F, C07H, C07J, C40B, A61K8¹, A61Q
Polymeric and macromolecular chemistry C08B, C08C, C08F, C08G, C08H, C08L
Medical technologies A61B, A61C, A61D, A61F, A61G, A61H, A61J, A61L, A61M, A61N, H05G

To be accepted in the Brazilian PPH program, an application must:

  1. Have a notification of filing or entry in the national phase in Brazil published by the Official Gazette of the Brazilian PTO;
  2. Already have been published (which can be effected by international publication (such as by a PCT application, if applicable);
  3. Have submitted a request for examination;
  4. Have all annuity fees duly paid;
  5. Have no pending Office Action awaiting response by the Applicant;
  6. Not have been accepted in any other fast-track examination program in Brazil;
  7. Not have been involved in a lawsuit in Brazil; and
  8. Not be a divisional application (except in the situation where the divisional application results from an original parent application due to a rejection due to a lack of unity of invention).

A request for participation in the Program must be made by all the Applicants in electronic form.  In addition to the other documents required by Rule #202/2017, an Applicant must submit, together with the request:

  1. Documents proving that the application meets the requirements of the Program;
  2. A table providing the correspondence between the claims in the Brazilian application and the allowed claims in the European application; and
  3. A copy of any non-patent prior art documents.

The Brazilian PTO will evaluate applications based on the date on which the request is filed.  Any applications that do not meet the requirements will receive an Office Action setting a sixty (60) day period to allow for any irregularities to be corrected or will be otherwise be denied participation in the Program.  Any application denied participation will be examined according to the normal procedures of the Brazilian PTO.  An applicant denied participation in the Program has an opportunity to appeal such a decision within 60 days of receipt of notification of denial.

The Brazilian-EPO PPH Pilot Program will begin on December 1, 2017 and will receive applications for a period of two (2) years.  A maximum of 300 applications will be accepted each year during the two (2) year period (for a total of 600 applications).

Brazil and the Chinese Patent Office 

On November 13, 2017, the Brazilian PTO and the Chinese Patent Office (SIPO, also known as the State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China) signed a memorandum of understanding establishing a future PPH Pilot Program (Program) between the two offices.  Much like the Program described above in connection with the EPO, Applicants will be able to request faster examination for a Brazilian patent application whose Chinese counterpart has already been approved.

A rule setting for the requirements for eligibility for the Program is expected to be published in February.

Please continue to watch the BRIC Wall Blog for further updates on the PPH Pilot Program in Brazil.

This post was written by Lisa Mueller and Roberto Rodrigues Pinho (https://www.linkedin.com/in/roberto-rodrigues-pinho/)

Third Party Observations in China – Part 7 of an 8 Part Series

This is Part 7 of an 8-part series examining post-grant review proceedings, oppositions, and third party observations in the U.S., BRIC and several non-BRIC countries. To see Part 1, Post-Grant Oppositions in Japan, click here. To see Part 2, Third Party Submissions in Russia, click here. To see Part 3, Pre- and Post-Grant Oppositions in India, click here; To see Part 4, Third Party Submissions in the U.S., click here. To see Part 5, Third Party Submissions in Europe, click here. To see Part 6, Third Party Submissions in Brazil, click here.

Public Observations

Rule 48 of the Implementing Regulations of Chinese Patent Law provides that any person may, from the date of publication of an application for invention until the date announcing the grant of the patent right, submit observations to the State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO). Such third party submissions are referred to as “public observations”. Observations can be submitted by any person in its own name or anonymously (such as through a straw man).

Observations can be submitted for invention patents but not for utility model patents.   Any ground of rejection of a patent application can form the basis of an observation. Such grounds can include lack of novelty, lack of inventive step, sufficiency of disclosure, lack of unity, lack of clarity, ineligible subject matter, double patenting, etc.

SIPO has an official form that allows a third party to submit arguments forming the basis of the observations. This form can be submitted electronically, if desired. If a third party wishes to submit documentary evidence (such as evidence of patents, published applications, non-patent literature, etc.) supporting the observations, then the observations and accompanying evidence should be scanned in and submitted electronically. If any evidence is in a language other than Chinese or English, it is recommended that a Chinese translation be provided. There is no official fee for filing observations.

It is recommended that a third party submit observations as early in prosecution as possible (such as prior to issuance of an Office Action) to allow the Examiner sufficient time to consider the observations. A claim chart comparing the features of the claims with the prior art can be submitted to facilitate the Examiner’s understanding of the arguments submitted in the observations.

According to SIPO’s Guidelines for Patent Examination, the public will not be notified of the handling of any observations submitted. In fact, Examiners have discretion to consider observations once received. It is not known what criteria Examiner’s use to determine whether or not to consider observations once received. Additionally, SIPO does not provide any information on the effectiveness or success rate of such observations.

This post was written by Lisa Mueller and Feynman Z. Liang of the Jiaquan IP Law Firm

BRIC-a-BRAC

1.  The State Intellectual Property Office (SIPO) of China has a new commissioner, Shen Changyu, Ph.D.  Dr. Shen received his Ph.D in engineering from Dalian University and has a background in national research projects and academia.  To learn more, click here.

2.  An interesting article in the Harvard Business Review looks at the prospects for increasing entrepreneurship in Africa.  The article notes that in order for an entrepreneur-lead boom to occur, entrepreneurs must transform their way of thinking.  Specifically, entrepreneurs will need to overcome their tendency to dream small (“small dreamer phenomenon”) as well as their fear of failure.  The article suggest that to do this, governments, incubators and investors will need to focus on: (1) creating better safety nets to enable failed entrepreneurs to get back on their feet; (2) educating entrepreneurs to think (and hence, dream) bigger; and (3) designing new mechanisms to promote trust between entrepreneurs and potential partners and employees.   To learn more, click here.

3.  During the past few months, the BRIC Wall has posted articles relating to biosimilar protection in several countries.  If you are interested in learning more about biosimilars in the United States, I published a chapter entitled “Helping Clients Understand Biosimilar Product Regulations and the Biosimilar Litigation Process” in Inside the Minds: Recent Developments in Food and Drug Law, 2014 edition.  A copy of the chapter is provided here Biosimilar Chapter.